Grahame N's Web Pages


9.5MM EQUIPMENT CATALOGUE

(Pathé, Pathéscope & Pathex apparatus - after 1940)


The following exhausting! and hopefully exhaustive list of 9.5mm Pathé (France) & 9.5mm Pathéscope (UK) equipment should include all the items from Pathé or Pathéscope which were actually marketed by these organisations from 1940. One-offs, privately made, or conversions, are not included. The lists only include cine cameras and projectors - there were also various accessories like spools, splicers, rewinders and the like which are not catalogued here at present.

Equipment from Pathé and Pathéscope was also marketed in Germany under the Pathex brand. In addition large volumes were sold in commonwealth countries like Australia, India and South Africa.

Because the pre-war source of Pathé 9.5mm film & equipment was France (plus small production in the UK but using some French made parts), the second world war decimated 9.5mm production. During the 1939-1945 World War, in France it appears much of the materials, spares etc. were lost or destroyed as were most of the triple negatives used for producing the 9.5mm printed film releases. In the UK once French imported parts and film stock supplies ran out, 9.5mm was in limbo; besides the Pathéscope Cricklewood factory was required for war work (assembling tank gun sights amongst other things). A deal was struck in the UK for limited film stock supplies from Kodak UK - so from 1941 there was a small supply of 9.5mm camera film and a number of new printed films were issued (restricted by the regulations in force to 'topical' subjects - ie newreel / war items only).

In France once the Nazis were driven out, the Pathé-Baby company got started again quite rapidly - by late 1944 new 9.5mm printed film specifications had been published and plans were in hand for a totally new range of 9.5mm and 16mm equipment to be launched as the 'Webo' range. The young designer's name was Jean Wesbrodt. (It is said the name 'Webo' came from a contraction of his name and that of then S.C.I. Pathé commercial director Jacques Broido).

For reasons maybe still unknown, to the casual observer, UK Pathéscope appeared to do nothing until the late 1940's - by which time many many movie enthusiasts had changed to the much improved 8mm Kodak format. Production of the "H" cine camera and "Ace" cine projector eventually restarted, with the new "Gem" cine projector design being launched during 1948 (but little advertising or publicity, nor actual product for the home market). It was not really till 1950 that the average punter realised that Pathéscope was still in business. Eventually they imported a limited range of the French products (probably hampered by the socialist government's massive import taxes and regulations - the UK had severe food rationing till 1952!). Problems with film rights going to TV saw their 9.5mm printed film release schedule slow to a trickle. With no sign of colour film (camera or printed) further adherents changed to 8mm, although 9.5mm Kodachrome eventually arrived in the UK in quantity in the early 1950s but at a very high price. Finally with the forced launch of a 9.5mm widescreen format ("duplex") which was a total failure, Pathéscope had to lose many of its staff and farm out assembly and servicing to a separate company. A buy-out of the French parent companies shares in 1958/59 by a UK entrepreneur left the company with a massive debenture loan (used to introduce a new cheaper 9.5mm colour film (actually Ferraniacolor) and the "Prince" cine camera & "Princess" cine projector - (which might have succeeded five or so years earlier) resulting in receivership around August 1960. Although Great Universal Stores bought the name and stock and continued trading in 9.5mm till 1964 as Pathéscope (London) Ltd., it appeared to be just a warehouse clearance exercise, leaving GUS with the Pathéscope name to use on catalogue photo products like binoculars, cameras, screens etc.

In France things were little better, with the amateur movie side of Pathé merging first with Cineric in 1960 to become Pathe-Cineric, then a year or so later around August 1961 merging also with Erscam (makers of Camex and Sonoclub equipment) to become EPC - Erscam-Pathé-Cineric.

By the late 1960s the once great ninefive gauge was left in the hands of die-hard enthusiasts as a cottage industry, but perhaps surprisingly, still exists today when its smaller std 8mm brother has virtually disappeared.

Where you see a blue underlined hyperlink, click on it for an illustration. Return to listing by clicking on 'back'.
Some underlined 'hyperlinks' now link to full articles and photos relating to a specific cine equipment company.
If you know of other 9.5mm cameras or projectors an e-mail with details would be appreciated!
Grahame Newnham at:- presto @ pathefilm.freeserve.co.uk (no gaps in my actual e-mail address)

Pathé & Pathéscope also produced amateur cine equipment in 28mm, 17.5mm, 16mm, Std 8mm and Super 8mm but generally only the 9.5mm items are listed here. I have already added pages for Pathé 17.5mm & 28mm, maybe someday I'll add the others !

All cine cameras were clockwork driven and projectors took 300/400ft spools unless otherwise stated.
Sorry about the quality of some of the pictures - when time permits they may be improved !
(Where the text entry begins with an asterix * it signifies I have an example in my collection)
Dates are only approximate and have usually come from magazine adverts, reviews, announcements etc.

The country listed is the origin of the design and main place of manufacture although parts were often exported for assembly in other countries. Sometimes the products were known by different names in different countries - in this listing I have normally used the most common marketing name, with other names mentioned in the text.

(In the UK, Pathé products normally carried the name Pathéscope, although this brand name also turns up in France sometimes, where all products should be labelled Pathé! No doubt much equipment has moved countries over the years and possibly different branded products were sometimes shipped to overcome stock shortages.)


These Pathé and Pathéscope products are listed in approximate date order


PATHÉ
WEBO A
CAMERA
1946-1953

France

* One of the products from the new Pathé engineer/designer Jean Wesbrodt, this camera used a new type 50ft film magazine which contained the claw mechanism. Whilst making the cameras simple and cheap to make, the cost of the magazines must have been high and the complicated design meant problems once the stock of magazines got old and worn. The camera featured a non-standard bayonet mount interchangeable lens - usually an 20mm f1.9 focussing Som Berthiot Cinor B or f2.5 fixed focus. A 50mm telephoto lens was also available. The Webo 'A' was offered for sale in the UK from around 1948 meaning Pathéscope dealers had yet another type of 9.5mm camera film packing to worry about! Typical serial numbers (inside - on camera door): 4313, 7232, 11999.

PATHÉ
WEBO M
CAMERA
1946-1981?

France

* Another design from Jean Wesbrodt, this moved Pathé into the semi-professional field with this the first true continuous reflex viewing cine camera. The design included 100ft spool loading, sprocket drive, interchangeable 'C' mount lenses and in various forms and makers, lasted until the demise of commercial 9.5mm. Initially offered in three versions in France - Norma, Touriste, Reporter - ranging from single lens to triple turret, variable speeds etc.

Within a year just one model remained - the Webo M Super. Probably the most advanced amateur cine camera at the time, it had full reflex viewing, triple lens turret, speeds from 8-80fps, backwind and variable shutter. The 16mm model was later offered with behind the lens meter, electric drive etc and was used by patriotic French TV and semi-professional film units. Maybe some of these later versions were sold in 9.5mm too. By around 1950 Pathéscope were able to offer these in limited number in the UK.(Review ACW July 1951) Typical serial numbers - 9.5mm models: 10409, 10757 (no idea of 16mm model serial numbers - mine are now sold)

A camera desperately sought after by UK ninefivers! In the UK 9.5mm was sold as a cheap home movie film gauge for the masses - hence few Webo M's were sold. In France where 9.5mm was marketed more for quality, many examples turn up. However whilst the reflex viewing and focussing make it ideal for titles etc. the camera is not really durable enough for heavy work. The lack of side springing for the film gate can result in some side weave and the spool loading needs care to avoid considerable film fogging during film loading/unloading.. In addition the sheer size and weight really demand a good tripod for most shots. A body colour change from brown to light grey signals a massive improvement in the brightness of the reflex viewfinder. On later cameras like the one pictured, the leather strap was replaced by a chrome grab bar. Incidentally the thin glass pellicule used to deflect a tiny portion of the light to the viewfinder is very, very fragile - check that an image is visible in the reflex viewfinder before buying and don't ever try to clean the thing! For those that have ignored this advice help is now at hand with a UK pellicule replacement service - cost is from £60 plus return postage - ring Andrew Hayden on 01493 700258


PATHÉSCOPE
ACE
PROJECTOR
1948?-1960

UK

* The little pre-war "Ace" was soon in production again after the war. Initially the machines were the later pre-war square body type, finished in black crackle. In 1949 a motor attachment was introduced, as a compromise between printed mute films and amateur movies it ran the projector at around 19 fps. Soon a more streamlined version of the Ace projector appeared with a curved top to the body and finished in the newer Pathéscope bronze colour. This had a 'bulge' on the side of the lamphouse to accomodate a new type 'AD' cylindrical lamp (A1/158), now transformer fed and rated at 19/20 volts 1 amp (20watts) - this was twice the wattage of the previous lamp and on test gave a very much brighter picture. The example shown has the motor attachment and transformer mounted neatly on a wooden board. The 'Ace' was not marketed in France. Click on Ace for fully illustrated article - updated 22Jan2017. (The "Ace" doesn't appear to be graced with a serial number!)

The Pathéscope 'Ace' was fitted with a number of lamps over the years - all operating on 19/20 volts. Initially a round 10 watts version, then the type 'A' cylindrical, still 10 watts. Finally the type 'AD' cylindrical 20watt version. Early 'Ace' projectors had the lamp fed from a dropper resistance (dangerous to use these days), later models used a 19/20 volt transformer but initially only rated at 10 watts. None of these lamps are available today. Some collectors fit a halogen QI lamp M29 6 volt 10 watt or G4 12 volt 20 watt display lamp. These are small enough to fit the lamphouse using a new tiny G4 holder fitted into the existing bakelite lamp holder but need a new 6 or 12 volt transformer.


PATHÉSCOPE
GEM
PROJECTOR
1948-1958

UK

* A British designed & manufactured machine not sold in France. Design had begun in 1939, by Pathéscope chief engineer Leslie Snoad, but the war intervened. A clever design of die-castings, using a 12 volt 100 watt lamp (A1/156) giving high intensity lighting with a series wound mains voltage motor enabled variable speeds with power rewind. An ingenious eccentric pin drive to the cam assembly gave 63% light transmission because of the accelerated film pull down. Sprung twin claws avoided major film damage although film did tend to wind back round the single sprocket at the end of a reel. The lens (normally 32mm focal length for 9.5mm) could have been better. 900ft spool capacity.

The Gem was manufactured in 8mm, 9.5mm and 16mm versions but Board of Trade restrictions meant most original production (especially 8mm) had to be exported. (Launched at British Industries Fair and described in Feb 1948 ACW and 'second look' June 1949 ACW). Typical serial numbers: 8128, 9053, 11646

A useful machine for showing 9.5mm silent films - an improved lens can be sourced for the 22mm mount (Bell & Howell 1 inch Increlite from an 8mm machine is recommended). Early models with two core mains cable should be rewired with earthed three core cable, and check the speed resistance on early models - the fibre arm bows and the unrecessed electrical contact may then touch the projector casing, making it live! Lamps may be upgraded (as per the Son) to A1/186, A1/215 or even A1/231. As per the Son always use the correct motor belt - an overtight Hoover belt will wreck the motor bearings and pull it off the rubber mounts! Motor brushes are 4mm square type. Take care with the three lamphouse screws - the threads soon strip!


PATHÉSCOPE
H
CAMERA
1948-1960

UK

* Whilst production of the 'H' in France (sold as the National) seems to have not restarted after the war - the 'H' became UK Pathéscope's main 9.5mm cine camera - British made, initially finished in the pre-war black, it was soon restyled in a light grey fine crackle finish. Options of parallex corrected viewfinder and variable filming speeds were soon offered. Easy film loading with the "H" charger containing about 8.2m / 28ft of film. The 20mm f2.5 fixed focus, 20mm f1.9 fixed focus, 20mm f1.9 focussing and 50mm f3.5 telephoto lenses were now UK made by the National Optical Company. Most lenses had internal threading for 19mm diameter filters, the little f2.5 fixed focus accepted 16mm slip-on filters.

Typical serial nos (inside camera door or on back of 'Points To Remember' card):- (All grey 1950s models:- 52364; 55899, 57397; all black 1950s models:- 54101 - did they make that many, or could the first number be the decade and the next four the production number / or the first two numbers the year of production and the next three the production number? Number 57397 is certainly a late 1950s model. Early UK made/assembled "H" cameras (just pre and post WW2)) don't appear to have serial numbers.

PATHÉ
BABY 53
PROJECTOR
1952 - 1955 ?

France

Not marketed in the UK. The smallest machine in the Joinville range. 400ft spool capacity, series wound variable speed motor. Large 12-tooth feed and take-up sprockets. 200watt mains voltage, pre-focus base lamp. 35mm f1.7 lens. Designed for 110/120 volts AC only. Appears that the machine in the photo (from a French web-site - thanks / merci!) maybe has had 900ft spool arms added (wrong colour) and a hole cut in the front (extra cooling perhaps?) Typical serial nos: 070608, 070842 (thanks Terry V.!)

PATHÉ
PAX
PROJECTOR
1950-1956

France

* One of the few French made Joinville projector models imported into the UK. The Joinville series had begun in France around 1948 with both silent and sound machines based on an entirely new design. Models were made in both 16mm & 9.5mm. This Joinville model was optical sound and silent, with series wound motor governed at 16 & 24fps. Initially a pre-focus A1/39 P28s 110 volt 400 volt lamp was fitted, later upgraded to A1/9 P28s 750watt. The lens mount was the 'standard' 32.5mm diameter, the 9.5mm machine normally came with a 35mm Angenieux f1.9 lens, although other focal lengths up to 60mm were available. It had a good stainless film gate with sprung edge guiding,. The 9.5mm version took up to 900ft spools. A decent design at the time, this was considered a quality 9.5mm sound machine. The first amplifier (J.P.4) used 'octal' valves - 6SC7M (first stage), 6SJ7M, 6V6GT (output), 5Y3GT (rectifier), later versions had amplifiers with miniature valves. (see ACW review June 1950) - note designed for 110 /120 volt operation! Typical serial nos: 001944, 001995, 002160 (all with JP4 amplfiers).

There were odd variations in the various original Joinville models - on the 9.5mm 'Pax' the film was smoothed after the sound drum using a metal chute in which the film was slightly pinched - (also used on the pre-war 17.5mm Home Talkie projector). This system was OK with new optical sound prints but splices and buckled film caused 'wow'. Many machines have been modified with rollers instead of this chute (see ACW 15 June 1961 for mod.details). Although much sought after by 9.5mm sound film collectors before the advent of the 16mm Elf / Eiki conversions, the machine is not as fantastic as it may appear. Much of the innards seems built down to a price and the rear flywheel / drive pulley is made of a mazac type casting which now often shows signs of cracking. Motor speed governor adjustment is by means of pliers bending the sprung contact, correct setting by trial and error! (I am told that models sold in France had a steel flywheel / drive pulley, screw adjustable governor and f1.6 projection lens)


PATHÉ
MARIGNAN
PROJECTOR
1951-1956

France

* Another machine based on the Joinville design the Marignan was announced for 9.5mm magnetic sound in France in May 1951. Initially fitted with an A1/39 110 volt 400 watt pre-focus lamp (and later up to 750 watts) it had the standard 32.5mm diameter lens mount and was normally supplied with a 40mm Som Berthiot f1.5 Cinor projection lens. It had a very nice stainless steel film gate with sprung edge guiding. The machine took up to 900ft spools, ran at a fixed 16fps with a synchronous motor and just a magnetic head with a screened connection to a separate record / playback amplifier. Hence the slim base. (Erase was by permanent magnet). Looking at the original publicity, Pathé had tried to fit a magnetic head on the 'Pax' model, but no doubt electrical noise from the motor had proved a problem. The launch of magnetic sound for 9.5mm in 1951 was even before 16mm systems were offered in Europe. However in the UK Pathéscope took another couple of years to announce the 'Marignan' for UK sale - no doubt because UK 9.5mm sales were mainly of low price equipment. A silent version of the 'Marignan' was available in France. By around 1955 Pathé had announced another Joinville machine in 9.5mm & 16mm - this featured magnetic record and mag/optical playback at 16 &24fps.
Another 110/120 volt machine! Note that the magnetic sound track is on the same side as the 9.5mm optical track. Later 9.5mm machines (16mm conversions) have adopted the 16mm magnetic stripe position- lhs when stood behind the projector.

PATHÉSCOPE
SON
PROJECTOR
1951 - 1956

UK

* A British made & designed optical sound projector not sold in France. Basically the 'Gem' mechansim fitted onto a casting incorporating the amplifier and sound drum, optics etc. The basic design was good, but Pathéscope directors decided the proposed £99 price tag too high and cut corners on components to get the price down to £78 - a real bargain for a sound projector! However the 180 volt motor, crude speed governor, and overheating amplifier caused many problems for customers, dealers and ultimately Pathéscope. The 12 volt 100 watt lamp (A1/156), accelerated claw movement and a claimed f1.9 lens gave a good picture for the time. The Mk1 amplifier using octal valves (6SJ7M, 6SJ7GT, 6V6GT (output pentode), 5Y3GT (rectifier)) lacked gain and tended to overheat unless the projector motor was left running to give some airflow.

A Mk2 model arrived after a year or two, this had an exciter lamp switch on the front of the machine below the speed control, an extra film guide roller on the top casing, and a much improved amplifier using the latest miniature B8A Mullard valves - 2 x EF40, EL41 (output pentode), EZ41 (rectifier).

Many Mk 1 & Mk 2 "Son"s must have been sold as they turn up quite often. Not sold in France. (Review in September 1952 ACW). Typical serial numbers: Mk1: 169; Mk2: 2170.

Today the A1/156 12volt 100watt is long obsolete, but the voltage allows the fitting of a Eumig P8 type A1/186 lamp which needs an adaptor sleeve to fit the existing lamp holder; or the small halogen A1/215 lamp with a new base (see my sales lists); or with the original optics removed even an A1/231 reflector lamp can be squeezed in! The Mk2 amplifier can still give acceptable results after the capacitors are replaced - (I have fixed one or two myself a while ago) or can be replaced with a solid-state design. Use of a too tight non-standard drive belt can ruin the main drive shaft & motor bearings making the machines very noisy. (Correct belts are on my sales lists!) The rather twisty film path around the sound drum and main sprocket is thought to have caused sprocket hole cracking problems with many vintage sound film prints - be warned!


An updated version of the Webo A with rounded, ribbed body lines, but otherwise technically the same as the earlier model.

PATHÉ
WEBO A LUXE
CAMERA
1953-1958

France


PATHÉ
JOINVILLE
PROJECTOR
1954-1958

France

Another of the French made Joinville series, this model featuring magnetic record/playback and optical sound playback, was eventually announced in the UK by Pathescope in the Dec1954/Jan1955 Pathéscope Monthly in 16mm and in the following issue in 9.5mm priced at £270 (marked '9.5mm mixed'). If the Pathéscope Monthly illustration is correct (sadly I don't possess one of these yet....) it retains the film guide shute after the gate. Synchronous motor drives at 16/24fps; 115volt AC input; 400 or 750 watt 110 volt pre-focus lamp; 40mm f1.5 Som Berthiot lens in 32.5mm diameter mount; most details as per Marignan and Pax models listed above. Superseeded by the PSM with push button motor/lamp switches.

PATHÉ NATIONAL 11
CAMERA
1954-1959

France

* In appearance very much like the earlier 'H' cinecamera, this later model had a redesigned mechanism, with the release button on the lower front of the camera, a rotatable ring selecting filming, stills or lock. The camera features variable filming speeds from 8fps to 32fps, an automatically resetting film counter, scaled in metres which is virtually continuous in action and a long running motor. The lens mount is the 'H' type screw mount & is normally fitted with a f1.9 focussing 20mm Som Berthiot Cinor C lens, internally threaded for 19mm diameter filters. . A 50mm telephoto lens and 10mm wide angle attachment were also available; the viewfinder is marked for the 50mm telephoto and had a flick down lever to show the wide angle field of view. The eyepiece disc rotates for parallex compensation.
The National 11 accepts the usual 'H' film chargers which contain around 8.2metres / 27foot 6inches of 9.5mm film.
Manufactured in France, it was also marketed there as the "National 11" (the "H" had been marketed in France as the "National", and also as the "HB".
Typical serial numbers (inside, on film gate release lever): 23759, 23784, 32684, 33878, 36662

Even today these cine cameras are quite sought after as a compact and reliable quality camera for 9.5mm filming. Examples I have used still run rather well and the results with the Som Berthiot lenses are excellent. It seems some were imported to the UK less lenses (to save on import duty?) and fitted with National Optical f1.9 20mm focussing lenses - also giving excellent results. The ease of charger loading and no loss of film footage through fogging, plus the compact design of the camera, makes this ideal for casual filming. I also like the slip through carry strap which enables the use of the Prince cine camera black zip-up nylon case to protect it from minor knocks.


PATHÉSCOPE
PAT
CAMERA
1953 - 1956

UK

* Following the Pathéscope post-war policy of low price filming on 9.5mm, the "Pat" was launched as a very low price (£13.18.3d) cine camera, which with the "Ace" projector at £6.19.6d formed a movie outfit for around £21! Even in 1953 the next cheapest movie camera was over £26. The British made "Pat" was clockwork driven, took the standard "H" film chargers and had the Pathéscope "H" type screw lens mount. Early models were black, later ones the more modern Pathescope bronze colour. However the lens fitted had just two 'waterhouse' stops 'dull' and 'bright', probably around f8 & f16. With compensated black & white film processing results were passable until the "SS" stock was phased out for the new type "SX" which had uncompensated processing. Problems also occurred with the spring belt (yes spring belt!) take-up, making dealers, already coping with many complaints about the cheap "Son" talkie projector, none too happy about "Pathéscope Perfected Products".
Not sold in France. (Full review in August 1953 Amateur Cine World).
Typical serial numbers: 1962, 3396

PATHÉSCOPE
AURATOR
MAGNETIC
SOUND-ON-FILM
UNIT
1955 - 1957

UK

* First advertised by Pathéscope early 1955, the model 'A' designed for the "Gem" and "Son" 9.5mm projectors was supplied to dealers from May. The "Aurator" was a magnetic sound stripe base to convert silent machines. It was a neat, lightweight (19lbs) unit with detachable speaker in the lid. The sound unit had a decent flywheel and a strobe for 16fps. It relied on the projector for the film transport. Obviously a UK design it had a valve line-up of EZ41 (rectifier), ECC81, ECC81, and EL41 (output pentode). Price was £55 (good value). (Not sold in France.)

Models 'B' (for the "H" and "200B") and 'C' for 16mm were also announced later in the year. Features were 5 watt output, neon light record level, volume and tone controls. The unit could also be used to play records or make announcements via the supplied microphone. I have yet to find a complete original example, although sound heads and sound unit assemblies turned up in the early 1960's when Pathescope stuff was sold off.. I also recall a local shop advertising a secondhand "Aurator" unit as 'great as a guitar amplifier'! My example is not in the original box (maybe a prototype?) and has not yet been put in working order so I can't comment on the sound quality. There's no sign of any screened wiring in my example (as with many of the "Son" projectors) but the use of a low impedance magnetic sound head may have helped to reduce hum. I would love to get a complete example for my collection, or even an instruction booklet. I guess the amplifier was designed and made by an electronics outfit with final assembly with the case and sound unit being done by Pathéscope?


PATHÉ
LIDO DUPLEX
CAMERA
1956 -1957

France

*The rumour is that during a boozy lunch in Paris where Pathé and Kodak bosses were spending the profits, (Kodak and Pathé film stock divisions in France had merged in the late 1920s), some Kodak wag suggested double-run 9.5mm would help flagging 9.5mm sales! Someone at Pathé took them seriously and a new format was announced. The camera would be held sideways, the double perforated 9.5mm 'duplex' film would be run through twice like standard 8mm. After processing the film was returned split - yes 4.75mm!

The image was slightly widescreen, naturally filming costs were halved, but the equipment wasn't ready when the large scale advertising campaign began and many ninefive dealers decided enough was enough (yet another filmstock packing to stock). The campaign in the UK virtually bankrupted Pathéscope and was the final nail in the coffin for this old established company.

However the cine camera that was finally made available was a rather nice looking piece of kit, winning design awards both in France and the UK. It took standard 'C' mount lenses and used 50ft spool loading. The basic model ran at 16 fps and was just for the 'duplex' format. Another version (the Universal) had variable filming speeds, single frame and parallax correction and could also be used with 'classic' ninefive film. Although Lido Duplex cine camera sales were virtually zero, the camera was relaunched for 9.5mm only and sold rather well in this new guise. See the Lido Classic entry further down the page. (Typical serial numbers genuine duplex Lido: 03272, 03368)


PATHÉ
MONACO DUPLEX
PROJECTOR
1956 - 1957

France

*The other half of the Duplex system (see Lido camera above), this was a stylish, expensive (£78 in 1956) projector designed (just!) to run normal 9.5mm silent films, unsplit 9.5mm duplex films (these would have two perforations on each frame line) and with the mechanism plate rotated to the horizontal position, the new ill-fated 4.75mm monoplex films.

The projector had a variable speed series wound motor and was fitted with a mains voltage A1/7 500 watt lamp, it could accept up to 400 foot spools.. The front film transport system could rotate between vertical and horizontal and was fitted with two Berthiot f1.5 lenses 40mm and 25mm focal lengths in 32.5mm mounts. There are what appear to be feed and take up sprockets, but on closer inspection they are just plain metal bushes!! From memory only the feed one rotates. I thought this was just my machine, but no - obviously there were major problems and the take-up 'sprocket' is a fixed metal bush!! The change between classic and duplex projection is very complicated and is carefully detailed in the instruction book. Done in the wrong order and the claw is damaged! (Typical serial number for a duplex machine: 1206)

Running a 4.75mm film is a nightmare - it curls and springs all over the place! Once safely threaded, the picture looks fine, slightly widescreen, but not really worth all the effort!! Needless to say, spools, splicers etc. are as rare as hen's teeth - I myself would like examples of 400ft 4.75mm projection spools and a splicer!! Luckily the late John Cunningham made a batch of 9.5mm duplex b/w filmstock and I made just one 100ft film. It was demonstrated at a Wimborne 9.5mm Mini-Festival and a Group 9.5 Pimlico meeting some years ago.

A total failure (it was rumoured just six machines were sold in the UK) this was financially probably the final nail in the coffin for the UK Pathéscope Ltd company. A few years later, the remaining machines were sold off in the UK, minus the 25mm lens and other duplex bits, at £45 each. Confusingly for the purchasers, the box contained the original duplex instruction book! (Typical serial number for a 9.5mm only Monaco: 2086)

PATHÉ
MIRAGE
PROJECTOR
1956 - 1957

France

* The Mirage took 400ft spools, 115/230 volts (France was just changing from 115 to 230 volts). It had a fixed speed induction motor, a 55 volt 50 watt? BA21/s base lamp fed from the motor windings and a 38mm f2? lens in a 20mm mount. I have a French colour advert showing an example on it's side for use with the ill-fated duplex format, but no one in France has seen an example, so like most other duplex items (except those listed above) the duplex version probably didn't actually go into production.
The two raised screws on the front allow a plate to be removed to expose the lamp - a special 35mm slide attachment could then be fitted. (Typical serial number A1468)

This real abortion of a projector luckily was never sold in the UK - I guess even Pathéscope had some standards! The projector (probably made for S.C.I. Pathé by LaPierre), has a simple induction motor (probably from the cheap record players of the time) with an extra 55 volt winding for the special lamp (like a bus bulb with internal reflector). The motor just drives a central single sprocket - there is no claw mechanism - there is a sprung peg (or sort of claw) in the gate, attached to a roller beneath the gate. With the film threaded, as the lower loop decreases, the roller is pulled back bringing the peg/claw with it - the film slips down, the sprung peg drops into the next perforation and so on... Perhaps OK on the 8mm version but the peg/claw scratches the centre of the 9.5mm film!! I thought this was just a problem with my example, but no, they all did it!! Hardly advertised in France, they were soon sold off as a cheap movie outfit with the remaining stock of the Webo "A" Luxe cine camera (which had been replaced by the Rio) with the buy-line something like - "cheaper then buying cigarettes"!


PATHÉ
P95
PROJECTOR
1958?-1964?
France

* The Pathé 'P' series, type 200, were the last in the long line of Joinville  post-war projector designs. This 'P' model had the large cast chassis and mechanism common to the whole range of machines. Fitted with a multi-winding asynchronous (constant speed) motor driving the mechanism at speeds from 16fps to 25fps via a variable pulley, it had a neon lit stroboscope marked for 16/24fps. The large sprockets and fully opening gate with sprung edge guiding made for easy threading. Semi-optical framing.
Mains voltage pre-focus lamps up to 750watts could be used. The 32.5mm lens mount normally carried a f1.5 Berthiot lens - 40mm for the 9.5 model. Spool arms stored in the lid accepted 1000ft spools. Push buttons were provided for motor/lamp and reverse running. A room light socket was provided. Mains input 110/220volt. (See ACW 5Aug1965 for brief review). (A large range of models were also supplied in 16mm - see ACW July 1956 for an earlier PM15 review).
As can be seen from the holes in the casing - the silent 'P' model could be upgraded to magnetic record/playback (PM95) or optical sound (PS16) and mag/opt (PSM16). (See the French 9.5 club magazine Ciné 9,5 No.261 Avril/Mai/Juin 1998)

This design continued for a year or two after SCI Pathé merged with Cineric (another French cine manufacturer), my own 1962 example is badged 'Pathé-Cineric'). From the late 1960's the remains of Pathé, trading as E.P.C. sold (in 16mm) rebadged versions of Bauer and Cinémecanica machines. The arguments continue as to whether 9.5mm models in optical (PS95) or optical & magnetic record/playback (PSM95) were ever sold. I recall being told by Pathéscope at a Photo-Fair in London around 1960 that they could supply a PSM95 to order - but being a broke schoolboy at the time I certainly couldn't have found the £300 or so to buy one anyway! A number of UK ninefivers continued to use the PM95 model for making their own sound films up to the millenium and beyond, but the magnetic track is on the same side as the 9.5mm optical track. Later 9.5mm machines (16mm conversions) have adopted the 16mm magnetic stripe position- lhs when stood behind the projector.
Problems with this machine will probably be replacement belts - they are sturdy vee belt type - a round type will probably not work with the variable depth pulley design used for the variable speeds; plus maybe replacement of the motor capacitor which is rated at 30Mfd!


Virtually the same camera as the 'Webo A Luxe' but with standard 'C' mount interchangeable lenses allowing the use of most 16mm lenses including zooms. S.C.I. Pathé in France had begun to use three letter words for their products just like Pathéscope in the UK. Launched at the European Photo Fair in 1958, I think these cameras were first shown by Pathéscope at the 1960 Photo Fair in London. (Yes I've used the Webo A Luxe photo!)

PATHÉ
WEBO RIO
CAMERA
1958-1964

France

 

PATHÉSCOPE
MK 1X
PROJECTOR
1958-1964

UK

*One of the first products from the reformed Pathéscope (Great Britain) Ltd. Really just a 'Gem' but with a pressed steel base instead of the casting (a retrograde step I think, but new look Pathéscope was owned by a fellow who owned a metal pressing firm!).

The 8mm version (Mk V111) was now fitted with the new 8 volt 50 watt lamp, but with Pathe 'T' base. The 9.5mm (Mk 1X) and 16mm (Mk XV1) models still had the A1/156 12 volt 100 watt lamp again with the Pathe 'T' base. The lenses now had a normal front piece, but were better quality Dallmeyer products - 32mm f2 on the 9.5mm model. It accepted up to 900 foot spools and had a variable speed series wound motor. (Sadly the lovely styling of the 'Gem' was lost in this quick fix relaunch.) I think someone had thought they could make a 'reverse run' work, but in the end the extra switch was labelled 'rewind' and just shorted out the motor speed resistor!

Available in 8mm, 9.5mm and 16mm versions, they were initially sold at just over £30 - cheaper than the 'Gem' had been. It sold well, but mainly the 8mm version. Typical 8mm serial number: 8402; typical 9.5mm serial number: 9048)

Remarks re. lamps, motor belt etc. same as the "Gem" and "Son" models.


 

PATHÉ
LIDO CLASSIC
CAMERA
1958-1970

France

*A version of the camera originally designed for the ill-fated Duplex system. This 'classic' model proved to be quite popular amongst remaining 9.5mm users in the UK. It took 50ft spools (light trapped), featured a standard "C" lens mount, and had a decent clockwork drive. It was normally supplied with an f2.5 fixed focus or f1.9 focussing 20mm Berthiot lens. Although the release button was threaded for a cable release, there was no provision for single frames. The door release and leather carry strap both had modifications during the production run. (UK review in ACW March 1959).
Later a model appeared with variable speeds & single frame release - called the Lido 1V (shown in the photo), it was actually the Duplex Universal model with the duplex bits removed! (UK review in ACW August 15th 1963) (Typical serial numbers: 00280, 02687)
These cameras were also offered in std 8mm and 16mm versions (both also 50ft spool loading)
The 9.5mm Lido classic or Lido 1 was still available into the 1970's, in fact I myself had a batch of unused cameras for sale up to around 1999, and they still worked OK!. Typical serial numbers: 04180; 04809.

The reason these cameras sold fairly well was because they looked modern, most other 9.5mm cameras at that time still had a pre-war appearance! Nowadays check that the Lido camera door does fit OK, those retained by a threaded bolt sometimes have stripped threads. The black felt light trapping around the door was never perfect when new (one assumes the designer of the body castings was not told it had to be light tight!) Whilst replacing the black felt light trapping may do the trick, many users these days wrap black tape around the door/body join once the film is loaded. Results are usually good, look for the f1.9 focussing lens and a 4-speed model. Try to load the camera in a dark corner to reduce fogging. The tripod bush is mounted at the front of the camera (see photo) and many tripods will foul the lower body of the camera. At the time a threaded aluminium bush was available to overcome this - I suppose it would be easy for someone handy with a lathe to make something similar.


PATHÉSCOPE
PRINCE
CAMERA
1959-1964

UK

 * Launched by the reformed Pathéscope (Great Britain) Ltd as half of a low price outfit for cine or stills (see Princess entry below) - this was a revamp of the 'H' and National 11 designs, but not sold in France. Normally supplied with an f2.8 approx 23mm focal length fixed focus Colortar lens in its standard 'H' interchangeable lens mount, it was also offered with a 20mm f1.9 fixed or focussing National Optical lens. These lenses were all internally threaded to accept 19mm filters. It was supplied complete with a neat black nylon zip-up carry case. The more modern appearance and a range of lenses (including a proposed zoom which didn't appear) plus the easy "H" charger loading. would have provided a good selling potential in the early or mid 1950's, but by 1959 few photo/cine dealers even recognised that 9.5mm still existed.

Although Pathéscope (Great Britain) Ltd went into liquidation around August 1960, the reformed Pathéscope (London) Ltd continued marketing the Prince camera & Princess projector up to around 1964 - they were even listed in the Great Universal mail order catalogues, who owned Pathescope (London) Ltd. Later, the remaining unsold cameras were 'junked off' minus name plates by a photographic wholesaler at silly prices - these were fitted with an f2.8 Kaydon lens. Later still, decent new 20mm focal length Berthiot f3.5 lenses were also sourced for this camera, these Som Berthiot Cinor lenses also accept 19mm screw filters. Try to find an example with original exposure plate on the side and a Colotar, Berthiot or National Optical lens. Results can still be very good and the camera still looks neat and modern although a bit heavy. Typical serial numbers: Pathescope original exposure plate models: L:044637 ; 00199, 00405, 00539, 01688; 02688 (my own!); "bankrupt stock" models: 00408, 01209; 02120; 02210, 02246; 03213, 03438; - that first number looks a little odd!!


PATHÉSCOPE
PRINCESS
PROJECTOR
1959-1964

UK

* Launched as half of a low price cine/still outfit (see Prince above) - this is really a cine projector stripped of all unecessary frills or prettiness. The design uses much of previous designs - an Ace optics and intermittent assembly, 22mm diameter Gem lens mount, gate frontpiece etc. The tiny 22volt 25watt lamp did give a passable picture for the time and the sprung claw avoided major film damage. For the price of £11-11sh hand-turned, or £14-14sh with motor it was certainly a bargain but not quite what the 'baby on the lawn' customers were looking for. Sales were very low. Supposedly a total of 2000 machines were manufactured. Not sold in France. Typical serial numbers: RP-95-485, RP-95-648, RP-95-715; RP-95-1224, RP-95-1508, RP-95-2084. (The 95 prefix suggests maybe they were thinking of an 8mm version?) Click on the 'Princess' for full article 19Oct2015

These machines have suddenly become rather collectable - e-bay internet prices of over £200 are now recorded! The first improvement is to fit a better lens - as per the Gem try an ex-Bell & Howell 1" f1.6 Increlite lens found on some std 8mm machines. (To allow for full focussing range, the webs inside the lens mount will need careful reduction for the Increlite lens to fit). Lamps may be difficult to find - possibly a halogen 6volt 20watt would be a suitable modification. These projectors were still not earthed, probably against the law even in 1959! It's worth fitting three core mains lead and maybe using one of the low voltage lamp leads to continue the earth to the machine itself. Take care with the wiring inside the transformer - the AC mains is carried forward to the projector for the motor.


PATHÉ
EUROP
PROJECTOR
1959-196?

France

*Quite a high class machine for showing silent films, the design coming partly from the ill-fated duplex Monaco projector. I believe early models had a 500 watt lamp, but it was launched in the UK with an 8 volt 50 watt integral mirror lamp, used with a converging lens to cover the 9.5mm frame size. Two tone grey finish (I also have one with grey gloss and black crackle side covers), 1000ft spool capacity, large 12 tooth sprocket feed and take-up, variable speed motor with in-built strobe for 16fps, reverse running, f1.5 Som Berthiot 40mm lens in 32.5mm diameter mount, pilot light, room lamp socket, power rewind. Connection for Synchromeca mechanical reel-to-reel tape sync. unit. Typical serial nos: 2845 (grey side covers); 2939 (black crackle side covers).
(ACW review September 7th 1961) Also supplied in an 8mm version with same 8volt 50watt lamp.

Film is best threaded coming off the front of the spool, standard in France anyway. Remove the belts before using the power rewind on 1000ft spools we are told in the review. The 8 volt 50 watt A1/17 lamp achieved 32 ft candles on a three foot screen! Also supplied in 8mm with the same 8 volt 50 watt A1/17 lamp. Generally supplied with a two core mains lead, but this can be changed to three core with the earth connected to a spring metal clip added to the input plug.
In the 1970s when Pathé in France merged with Cineric, this design and remaining parts were used by André Ligonie to produce a further batch of Super Europs - these used most of the Pathé parts, but were fitted with an induction motor with belt change fixed speeds of 16 & 18 fps and a 12 volt 100 watt A1/231 reflector lamp giving an even brighter picture. Some Ligonie samples I have seen, seem to suffer from cam wear giving an unsteady picture (cam greasing and gate tension adjustment improves things) - maybe just over use!


PATHÉ
BABY 60
PROJECTOR
1959-1964 ?

France

* Amongst the last in the French Webo Joinville series of projectors this, the smallest in the range had a mains voltage 500watt A1/7 prefocus lamp, large 12 tooth sprockets, a series wound variable speed motor, Som Berthiot Cinor 40mm f1.5 lens (in 27mm diameter mount) and accepted up to 400 foot spools. All built into a light coloured rexine finished wooden case. (Typical serial numbers: 025637, 025664) An 8mm version was also available. I believe the UK retail price was £48.
A similar model, the Baby 53, (see above), with 200watt lamp was sold in France around 1953 but not in the UK. Around 1970 (see Group 9.5 magazine October 1970) the Baby 60 was 'relaunched' as the "Record" - assembled with ex-Pathé parts for Cine-Photo-Radio Muller of 14 Rue des Plantes, Paris 14c, it was much the same, but with 12 volt 100 watt QI lighting and 35mm Cinor f1.5 lens.

With the house mains voltage in France being around 220 volts AC at the time, an extra mains dropper resistance was fitted internally for the models sold in the UK to cope with our nominal 240 volt volt mains supply. Some customers complained that the motor would still not run slow enough for 16fps films. I guess the designers needed a decent air flow to cope with the 500 watt lamp which was quite a tight fit in the lamphouse. As the lamp is a standard mains voltage pre-focus type, there is no reason why a lower wattage could not be fitted for home shows. The take-up spool position means the machine must overhang the edge of a table or projector stand when in use. I find this rather a nice little projector giving good results. Although stocked by D.M. Bentley, the Pathescope main (only?) dealer in the 1960's, he found that most new 9.5mm projector sales were for the little Cinegel, presumably because it was slighter cheaper.


PATHÉ
PSM9.5
OPTICAL/
MAGNETIC
SOUND
PROJECTOR
1959-196?

France


ACW Aug1960 projector guide

The ultimate machine in the French made Joinville series, listed by Pathéscope in their last price lists shown (in 16mm) at the 1959? UK Photo-Fair & detailed in the ACW Projector Guide (Aug1960). Designed for optical sound and full, half and edge magnetic stripe record & playback. 110 volt 1000 watt pre-focus base lamp, 50mm f1.6 Berthiot lens, gate with sprung edge guiding, hinging outwards for cleaning. Later models had three twelve tooth sprockets. Asynchronous motor with mechanical 16 / 24 fps speed change. Reverse run, power rewind. Optical track can be recorded onto half magnetic track; superimposition, separate gram. input with volume control. 6 volt 30 watt exciter lamp, RF fed. 15 watts output, 12 inch loudspeaker, magic-eye level setting, headphone monitoring. Claimed frequency response 35-9000 Hz at 16fps; 35-15000 Hz at 24fps. The later PSM16 - 200 was suitable for 110 and 220 volt AC mains supply.

As a 'broke' schoolboy of about 14, I actually saw the 16mm version on display at the Pathéscope stand in a UK Photo-Fair. The salesman was quite friendly, and assured me they could get a 9.5mm model to order in a week or so. As the price at the time was £330, I was unlikely to place an order (as we moved onto another stand, my father said something like "You'll be lucky"!) We know that no PSM95 machines were ever sold in the UK. The discussion continues as to whether any 9.5mm machines were ever sold in France. Examples do turn up, but may be 'home made' conversions of the PSM16. This photo was 'pinched' from a French web-site, but is hopefully correct (if someone will sell me a PSM95 then we can have an authentic photo!) - at least the other picture is genuine but the 16mm model - virtually the same appearance.


PATHÉ
WEBO RIOPHOT
CAMERA
1960-1970

France

* Virtually the same camera as the 'Rio' but with a match needle exposure system. The cell was behind the lens so that filters etc. were automatically taken into account. The original models were set for Kodachrome 1 film only, but it was a simple matter to add extra marks at the bottom of the viewfinder to match the needle to other film stocks like B/W, Ferraniacolor (PCF in the UK), etc. (After the home movie side of Pathé merged with other companies in France, production was continued for a few years by French 9.5mm specialist André Ligonie). A very simple camera to use - easy drop-in 50ft film magazine loading and exposure setting; plus clockwork drive so no batteries to run down.
These days the magazines have to be reloaded by the user and may be prone to jamming; check that the exposure meter still works OK too! Typical serial numbers (inside - on what would be the side of the film gate): 70506, 71227 Typical Rio serial numbers 55277, 55871.

PATHÉ
PM9.5
MAGNETIC
SOUND
PROJECTOR
1962-196?

France

By this time the amateur cine side of Pathé in France was feeling the pinch and had merged initially to become Pathé-Cineric, later Erscam also became involved and the final company was known as E.P.C. (Erscam/Pathé/Cineric). The range of Joinville type machines was updated, with new models in 9.5mm and 16mm. The PM9.5 and PM16 were modern style versions of the earlier Marignan magnetic stripe record/playback projector. This model was fitted with a 750 watt pre-focus lamp and f1.5 bloomed lens. It boasted quiet running and a weight of only 18 lbs. The sprung edge guide gate gave nice steady pictures, whilst the 8 watt amplifier boasted comprehensive mixing facilities and quality sound. Three sprockets enabled the sound head to be properly decoupled from the intermittent motion - no film chute device here!

This model provided the remaining ninefive dealer/distributor in the UK (Michael Bentley) with something decent for up market ninefive film makers to show their films with. Although priced at £230 a number of UK 9.5mm enthusiasts bought this machine which gave an excellent performance and good service, but note that the magnetic sound track is on the same side as the 9.5mm optical track. Later 9.5mm machines (16mm conversions) have adopted the 16mm magnetic stripe position- lhs when stood behind the projector..


  PATHÉ  

A LITTLE MORE DATA STILL TO GO IN FOLKS, PLUS A FEW MORE ILLUSTRATIONS, PICTURES!


The reformed Pathéscope (London) Ltd did initially try to push the ailing 9.5mm amateur film gauge, even running regular half-page advertising in the UK Amateur Cine World magazine (I think they also advertised other photo gear in the UK Amateur Photographer magazine). Here are a few of the advertisements from 1961..

However by Christmas 1961 the
Pathescope advertisements began
to include other (better selling!)
products from the Great Universal
Stores catalogue photo lines.

I think they had got the message that
the 9.5mm amateur film gauge was
no longer a mass market product.

Incidentally, during 1961 two names
began to appear in little adverts in
the Amateur Cine World classified
columns - that of Pearce and Bentley
These two gentlemen later trading
separately as L.G.Pearce / LGP Cine
from Wembley and D.M. Bentley
from Brighouse, Yorkshire, were to
be the sole commercial suppporters
of the 9.5mm film gauge (including
the supply of camera and printed
9.5mm films) for many years to come!


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August 2005 - "Ace" article added - linked to "Ace" entry
Jan 2006 Mk9 photo and "Aurator" listing added. Aug 2006 "Mirage" listing added. Nov 2006 PM9.5 added
June2007 Lido added. Aug 2007 'typo' spotted. Dec2007 Duplex Lido text added, other minor typos & updates.
May2010 Odd tidying; Europ photo added. July2010 Ace article updated
July2011 A few serial numbers added - I suppose if we can find out the start point for some of these, production quantities could be established. Certainly the "Pat", "Prince" & "Princess" numbers probably started from 1. Watch this space!
Oct2011 - Details of "H" / "National 11" / "Prince" cine camera filter sizes added
Feb2012 - a few more serial numbers added, typos sorted and minor text changes
July 2012 - a few more serial numbers and extra data, plus Monaco text added
Oct2012 - a few extra details added for "H" camera; Dec2012 - extra data for Baby 60 projector added
Apr2013 - new Prince/Princess article linked to "Prince/Princess" entries on this page / new "Pat" photo
March& May2014 - Ace article updated. April2014 extra serial nos ; extra lamp details for Son/Gem & odd edits added
Jun2014 - PSM95 projector added / 16Aug2014 - Joinville mag/opt projector added
13Oct2014 - Minor text changes: Pathescope advertisements from 1961 added
16Oct2014 - Pax film path mod article added / 18Oct2014 - Pax ACW advert added / 09Dec2014 - Baby 53 added
11Jan2015 - extra photos added to Prince/Princess article / 19Jan2015 - mention of the Baby 60 'relaunch' as the "Record"
09Mar2015 - Pathescope "H" camera leaflet scan added. / 11Mar2015 - "Ace" article extra illustrations added
19Jul2015 - PathePSM extra text & photo added / 01Nov2015 - Pathescope "Gem" page added / 21Mar2016 - Webo M page added
Created 2001 ........ Last updated: 22 January 2017 ............ 95gearpathe1.htm ............... © G.L. Newnham MM1-MMXV